Tuesday, March 16, 2010

Congratulations and Cleaning

Congratulations to my highschool buddy and his wife who had their first child this morning. He is a healthy baby boy of 7 lbs 3 oz and 20 inches (so he looks tiny compared to my giant). Blessings!!

Anyway....bleach is awful. I worked at a daycare and that stuff is so caustic. By the end of the day your hands are dry and that has nothing to do with its strength. We had to dilute it 1 part bleach to 10 parts water for sanitizing purposes. Since we change diapers, there are heavy regulations on sanitation. You have to wear gloves. You have to wash your hands before and after changing a diaper. You have to wash the area with soap and water and then hose it down with bleach and water after the change. And you have to wash the child's hands after a diaper change. Have you ever fought to wash the hands of a one year old? It's tough. They cry. And two years olds demand more soap even though they've washed their hands like a million times.

The diaper changes were the worst part of the job. And parents are oblivious to the fact that the child you just changed had diarrhea or a poo filled diaper that leaked all over the child and the diaper changing area. And they just ploop down their child's lunch and cup and whatever on the area while your trying to put the other child in clean clothes. And they don't seem to notice the poo sitting on the diaper changing table. Even though it clearly says you can't put anything on that changing table because it has to remain sanitized. Ewww gross.

And then I haven't explained the part about cleaning dishes. You have to have a three part sink and a separate sink to wash your hands. The first sink is soapy water where you scrub the dishes. The second sink is filled with plain water where you dunk the dish (so at the end of a long train of dishes it's a lot of soapy water). The third sink is for sanitizing. It has a higher dilution of bleach then the diaper changing table. This is where you dunk the dish after it was "rinsed". And no you don't re-rinse it either. So the dish has a nice coating of bleach/water on it. And yeah, your kids are getting food prepared and eaten from and drank from bleach coated dishes.

Yeah, now you understand why I hate bleach. Day cares are regulated and instructed that they must use it. Why can't they use alternatives?

Here are some sanitizing alternatives to bleach:
distilled white vinegar
vodka (yes, the alcoholic variety)
sunlight (for laundry)
Tea tree oil (not recommended for consumption but great for skin; diaper changing tables anyone?)

So why can't the health department let daycares use safer alternatives to bleach and it's caustic properties? I bet five years from now they are going to discover children from daycares are developing gastric disorders, respiratory disorders, and cancer from all the bleach that they get on their skin, in their stomachs, and breath into their lungs (because it is also being used to sanitize the toilets and floors).

I say we have a ban the bleach campaign and start now. I need to make a button for it. Anyone got any ideas for a slogan?

4 comments:

  1. No ideas at the moment, but good idea. I hate bleach too. We mostly use the vinegar option (love that it kills the same amount of germs as bleach, so they really have no excuse for not allowing it as an alternative), but tto is great too. I mostly use it in the wash, but started doing a water/tto spray for our shower and use it in the kitchen some too. Anytime I think an area needs extra care.

    Random side note, someone asked about cleaning toys online awhile back. Me & a few others mentioned vinegar & the rest of the replies were all bleach and about how safe it is since its diluted (one was a daycare worker too lol) and how if it wasn't safe it wouldn't be allowed in schools. I about wanted to bang my head against a wall. Found out from one of the others that its not even allowed in certain other countries. Interesting.

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  2. Because the government says that you have to use it, they think it's safe. People trust the government too much. I'm not paranoid to think that there is some conspiracy between the government and bleach manufacturers. I just think the government regulators are dumb.

    Why don't people read the labels? Do not ingest. Keep away from Children. Warning. Do not get into eyes. That's why daycares are required to lock the stuff up even the diluted stuff. Yet we're still having to spray it on surfaces that children touch and lick and stuff. What's wrong with this picture.

    Distilled vinegar doesn't have that warning label on it. Why? Because you can eat it!! Common sense would tell you to use that stuff in daycares and not bleach.

    And I've read the label for tto, it says to keep out of reach of children, not to apply it to broken skin or tender areas (eyes, ears), is flammable, and to not ingest. It's not as bad as bleach where it even goes into being careful about fumes etc. It's also less harmful to the environment than bleach. You don't have to use as much.

    But I'll get off my soap box and start thinking of some sort of slogan. Maybe I'll hold a contest of some sort. A free gift certificate to Amazon if you can come up with a great slogan or something. I'll ponder it some more. Alternatively, I know a good slogan writer for the job. My dad. He has a degree in marketing. He's always coming up with something. Used to put quarky messages on our machine. Even people dialing the wrong number would leave a nice comment about how great they were. Too bad dad worked for the government instead of using his talent. Oh well.

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  3. LOL but agreed. I keep our TTO on a high shelf in the (locked) laundry room along w/ a few other similar things (or worse, we do still have a few harsh chemicals around even if we rarely/never use them). I'm ok with using it, but has to be done safely too. The broken skin bit surprises me a bit though because its recommended for several treatments that can include broken skin.

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  4. Above the warning label it does say that it is traditionally used as a topical agent for the skin. LOL I bet the government regulators (FDA) said that they needed to put a warning label on it about the skin.

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I love to read your thoughts. Thanks for sharing!